Project Description

Smokeless Tobacco Project: Smokeless Tobacco Use and Reproductive Health Practices Among Women in Mumbai, India:

ICR and researchers from the National Institute for Research on Reproductive Health, Mumbai, a center of the Indian Medical Research Council (ICMR), received three years of funding to study a “slum” in Mumbai. Marketing strategies for different types of smokeless tobacco vary depending on local cultural practices. In India, many forms of non-smoked tobacco have existed for some time. During the early qualitative phase, the study identified smokeless tobacco outlets and the forms of smokeless tobacco available in the study community or nearby. Researchers then conducted in-depth interviews with community experts and women users about smokeless tobacco practices and reproductive health, as well as a survey with a sample of 400 smokeless tobacco users.

Additional Information:

ICR:
Jean J. Schensul, Ph.D.
Principal Investigator

National Institute for Research on Reproductive Health, Mumbai:
Saritha Nair, Co- Principal Investigator

Dr. Donta Balaiah

Sameena Bilgi

Sunitha Goveas

Kavita Amol Patil

Sunita James DMello

Vaishali Kiran Kadam

Dr. Pasi Yogitha

Consultants:
Healis Foundation

Navi Mumbai

P.C. Gupta

Mangesh Pednekar

In 2009, ICR and researchers from the National Institute for Research on Reproductive Health, Mumbai, a center of the Indian Medical Research Council (ICMR), received three years of funding to study a “slum” in Mumbai. The location includes a mix of people from Maharashtra and from the northern states of Uttar Pradesh, and Bihar, which is typical of many areas in India. Fieldwork for the study began in February of 2010. During this early qualitative phase, the study identified smokeless tobacco outlets and the forms of smokeless tobacco available in the study community or nearby. Researchers conducted in-depth interviews with community experts and women users about smokeless tobacco practices and reproductive health. During 2011-2012, researchers surveyed a larger sample of 400 smokeless tobacco users.

The field team mapped every street and bylane in the study community of 20,000, and identified over 200 tobacco outlets in this small geographic location. They photographed many different forms of tobacco and recorded cost per unit as well as purchasing patterns. There was some difference of opinion as to how many women are perceived to be using smokeless tobacco products. The general feedback however was that paan use is widespread, gutka is used by both women and men, and mishri which is fairly widespread is used only by women.

To study the uses of smokeless tobacco in relation to pregnancy practices and self management in women of reproductive age in a low income area of Mumbai